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Elizabeth Ross Chapter DAR
Ottumwa, Iowa


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Honored Daughters

"Real Daughters"

Mrs. Rebecca Smith Tylee

Rebecca Smith was born December 26, 1809, in Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania, to Nathaniel Austin Smith. Rebecca's father was a sergeant in Captain Josiah Lacey’s Company of Colonel Philip Bradley’s Connecticut Regiment and was wounded at the Battle of Monmouth.  She married Edward R. Tylee in 1829.

Rebecca and her husband moved to Van Buren County Iowa, in 1839, constructing the first brick house in town. Mr. Tylee was a delegate to the convention at Burlington, Iowa, which formed the Iowa Territory. Rebecca was one of the first Methodist Class formed at Keosauqua in the Purdon Cabin which was located near the Des Moines River, up river of Keosauqua not far from the mouth of the small creek that runs around Purdom Cemetery. Rebecca was a teacher for years in the Sunday School held in the Court House and later in the Methodist Church. Rebecca died of pneumonia on March 22, 1905, in Superior Wisconsin, at age of 95 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Hannah J. Hare. She is buried at the Purdom Cemetery in Keosauqua, Iowa.

The Elizabeth Ross Chapter DAR placed a plaque at her grave site in June 1928. In May 2006, the plaque was restored and replaced in the same spot by the Van Buren Chapter DAR with the assistance of the Elizabeth Ross Chapter DAR.

Tylee marker
Marker placed at the gravesite of Mrs. Tylee originally in June 1928. Restored and replaced in 2006.
We regret that we cannot provide lineage information. The information on this page cannot be used as proof of service or lineage for purposes of joining DAR.
For membership inquiries please contact our chapter or fill out the membership interest form on the NSDAR website.

Pumphrey marker
                                      dedicationMrs. Edith Wells Pumphrey

Edith (or Editha) Wells was born October 18, 1783, in Wellsburg, Virginia, to Henry Wells and Jemimia Coe/Cole.  Edith's father was a sergeant in the Revolutionary War who served in Col. Burgess Ball’s Company, the First Virginia Regulars commanded by Richard Parker. Edith married Joshua Pumphrey.  Edith Pumphrey and her son Serene were among the first settlers in the Absecum, Iowa, area. They moved to Des Moines Township in 1846 and erected a two-room log house. In 1849 Serene Pumphrey operated a freight line from Keokuk to Fort Dodge and built two more log houses at the village of Absecum. One of the houses replaced the original log house which was destroyed by fire.

She died October 29, 1858, and is buried at the Gonterman Cemetery in Jefferson County, Iowa, near Batavia.
The Elizabeth Ross Chapter DAR dedicated a marker at her grave site in 1936.
marker
We regret that we cannot provide lineage information.  The information on this page cannot be used as proof of service or lineage for purposes of joining DAR.  For membership inquiries please contact our chapter or fill out the membership interest form on the NSDAR website.




"real daughters"

(Daughters of Revolutionary War soldiers, who were not members of DAR)

Mrs. Sarah Ann Osborne Fuller

Sarah Ann Osborne was born October 11, 1812, in Winslow, Maine, to Ephraim Osborne, Jr. and Lydia Wyman. Lydia was Ephraim's third wife.  Ephraim Osborne, Jr. was elected constable of Winslow, Maine, in 1779 and served during the rest of the Revolutionary War.   He took time off to serve for a short time in Captain Thomas Cowdin’s Company of Colonel Samuel Denny’s Regiment.

Sarah married Samuel Bean Fuller on January 11, 1835. They came from Maine to go into the dry goods business which they established in Ottumwa, Iowa.  Sarah died September 10, 1892, and is buried in the Ottumwa Cemetery, Ottumwa, Iowa.  Sarah’s body was taken to its final resting place in a horse drawn carriage over unpaved streets.  A marker was placed at Sarah's grave site on June 18, 1937, by the Elizabeth Ross Chapter DAR.

Mrs. Jane Gibson Wilson

Jane Gibson was born in 1810 to Daniel Gideon Gibson. Jane's father, Private Gideon Gibson served three  years in the Revolutionary War, entering at age 15. He served under Captain John Moor. Jane married Allen Wilson in 1829 and died in 1863.  She is buried at the Ottumwa Cemetery in Ottumwa, Iowa in the Wilson family plot near the soldier's family lot.  The Elizabeth Ross Chapter dedicated a marker at her gravesite on June 6, 1922.

Mrs. Elizabeth Bradley Stinson

Elizabeth Bradley was born May 11, 1780, in Charlotte, North Carolina, to Francis Bradley. Captain Francis Bradley was one of the leaders of the Patriots of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.  He was instrumental in writing of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence.  The Torries, having learned this lured him into the woods and then murdered him.  Elizabeth was married to Alexander Stinson on August 21, 1800.  She died February 15, 1856, and is buried in the West Grove Cemetery, Davis County, Iowa.  A marker was placed at her gravesite in 1927 by the Elizabeth Ross Chapter: Mrs. Mary Spader Van Kirk. Mary Spader was born in New Jersey August 7, 1793, to Bergen Spader and Elizabeth Nyneorson.  Her father, Bergen Spader served as a private in the Revolutionary War. Mary moved with her parents to Indiana and there she married John Van Kirk. She cared for her aged father and an orphan niece, Elizabeth Lowry, a sister’s daughter.  When Elizabeth married James A. Stansberry of Lexington, Indiana, they moved to Iowa and Mrs. Van Kirk came with them. They settled on a farm near West Grove, Iowa, in Davis County.  Here, Mrs. Van Kirk died May 9, 1857, and is buried in West Grove Cemetery, Davis County, Iowa. A marker was placed at the gravesite West Grove Cemetery May 1927 by the Elizabeth Ross Chapter DAR of Ottumwa, Iowa. 

Mrs. Phoebe Moore Pollard

Phoebe Moore was born on June 26, 1799, to William Moore and Sarah Grimit .  Phoebe was the sixth child of a family of eleven children.  Her father, William Moore, served in the Revolutionary War as a Private in the Virginia Continentals, serving three years.  He received land warrant #4016 for 100 acres of land in Kentucky. Phoebe was married in 1830 to Dudley Pollard.  His father, James Pollard, was also a Revolutionary soldier. In 1855, Mr. and Mrs. Pollard moved to Iowa with their family of three children and their families and settled in Davis County four miles southwest of Bloomfield.  Phoebe died June 14, 1865 in Davis County, Iowa.  Both Phoebe and her husband are buried side by side in the Pollard Cemetery in Davis County, Iowa.  This cemetery may also be known as the West Grove Cemetery. Mrs. Pollard was the great grandmother of Mrs. D.H. Criley, a past regent of Elizabeth Ross Chapter DAR. A marker was dedicated at her gravesite on November 11, 1927, by the Elizabeth Ross Chapter.

Mrs. Elizabeth Carberry Pike

Elizabeth Carberry was born in 1799 to Joseph Carberry and Mary Elizabeth Carberry. She married James Brown Pike in 1815. They had eight children.   Elizabeth was not only the daughter of a Revolutionary War soldier, but she and her husband made a home for her husband’s father, Colonel Zebulon Pike, a member of General Washington’s staff and a personal friend of Lafayette.  James Brown Pike was a brother of the great explorer, General Zebulon Montgomery Pike, who explored the Mississippi to its headwaters in 1805.   He was the first to erect the American Flag on Iowa soil at Blackhawk Spring in what is now known as Crapo Park in Burlington, Iowa.  Zebulon M. Pike also explored the country west from St. Louis and discovered Pike’s Peak in 1806.

Elizabeth  and her husband came to Iowa about 1847, settling in Wapello County.   Their family grew up in Wapello County.  Son William M was killed in a pioneering adventure.  He has a daughter, 84 years of age living in Oregon; George Washington, whose son Henry died while serving in the Civil War and whose descendents are living  in Ames, Jefferson and other cities in Iowa; Montgomery who later went to California. One daughter, Catherine died as a young woman.  An oil painting was produced by her lover and is in the possession of Rev. Pike of Richland.  Another daughter Isabelle married William Mann whose only son became an officer in the regular army.  Elizabeth died in 1855 and is buried in the Kirkville Cemetery, Kirkville, Iowa.  The Elizabeth Ross Chapter dedicated a DAR marker at her grave site on November 19, 1927.

Mrs. Elizabeth Babcock Smith

Elizabeth Babcock was born January 25, 1803, in Pennsylvania to Nathaniel and Elizabeth Babcock. When she was quite young, her family moved to Ohio. She married Noah Smith in 1827. In 1844, they moved to Iowa, settling in Van Buren County.  In 1848 they moved to Davis County to the little village of Albany.  Albany was located on the main road from Des Moines to Keokuk and this is where they operated a small hotel that kept overnight travelers.  They also had a general store and brought all their goods from Keokuk in huckster wagons.  They had four sons and two daughters.  Elizabeth also raised a distant relative and, tragically, one of her daughters died and left two small sons whom she raised.  During the Gold Rush in California, her husband and one son went to seek their fortunes leaving Elizabeth to care for the rest of the family.  On the way to California the son died of mountain fever and was buried in the plains by the side of the trail.  Elizabeth died October 31, 1886, and is buried at the Albany Cemetery in Davis County, Iowa. A marker was placed at her grave site on June 2, 1928, by the Elizabeth Ross Chapter DAR.

Mrs. FullerMrs. Sarah Ann Osborne Fuller

markerSarah Ann Osborne was born October 11, 1812, in Winslow, Maine, to Ephraim Osborne, Jr. and Lydia Wyman. Lydia was Ephraim's third wife.  Ephraim Osborne, Jr. was elected constable of Winslow, Maine, in 1779 and served during the rest of the Revolutionary War.   He took time off to serve for a short time in Captain Thomas Cowdin’s Company of Colonel Samuel Denny’s Regiment.

Sarah married Samuel Bean Fuller on January 11, 1835. They came from Maine to go into the dry goods business which they established in Ottumwa, Iowa.  Sarah died September 10, 1892, and is buried in the Ottumwa Cemetery, Ottumwa, Iowa.  Sarah’s body was taken to its final resting place in a horse drawn carriage over unpaved streets.A marker was placed at Sarah's grave site on June 18, 1937, by the Elizabeth Ross Chapter DAR.
Fuller marker today