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Hannah Lee Chapter NSDAR
West Union, Iowa


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Patriots' Biographies

Grimes, James

James was born in County Down, Northern Ireland, in 1754. He served in Captain George Houston's Company and Colonel Benjamin Harrison's Regiment as a private and then as a sergeant. He was in the engagements at Burnt Chimneys and Williamsburg, Virginia. James married Isabella (no b/d or maiden name) in Kentucky. Their first child, John, was born in Kentucky, in 1788. Patriot James Grimes died in Ripley County, Indiana, on November 11, 1833; Isabella also died in Ripley County, Indiana.

Known Children:
     
John     b. 1788

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Hawley, Daniel

Daniel Hawley was born September 4, 1741, son of Matthew (1714-1800) and Hannah (1722-1798) Hawley, in Canaan Town, Columbia County, New York. The Hawleys were among the early settlers of New Canaan, New York.

Daniel Hawley served as a private in the 9th Regiment, Albany County Militia, during the Revolutionary War. His father, Matthew Hawley, was also a private in the Albany County Militia (17th Regiment). The Albany County Militia, as part of the New York State Militia, fought under Brigadier General Abraham Ten Hoeck at the Battle of Saratoga. The victory of the American troops at Saratoga is considered one of the turning points of the Revolutionary War. Matthew Hawley received land bounty rights in Kings District (later Canaan Town) for his service in the Albany County Militia.

The Kings District records show Daniel Hawley as an active and respected member of his community. He served twice as Constable, Assessor, and Fence Viewer; once as Pathmaster, and once received Captain Bristol's beat between 1779 and 1800. (Note: in 1788 the Kings District of Albany County became Canaan Town of Columbia County.)

Daniel Hawley was married to Eunice Sprague (1751-1834) on February 14, 1780, at Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (The list of children is from the records of the Reverend Gideon Bostwick of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.) Also listed in records of the Reverend Gideon Bostwick, is Abigail, baptized August 21, 1770, child of Daniel and Hannah (Warner) Hawley.

Daniel Hawley died March 4, 1801, and is buried at Canaan Center Cemetery, New Canaan, New York, along with his wife Eunice, who died October 2, 1834, at the age of 83. After Daniel Hawley's death Eunice was married to Daniel West.

Known Children:
      Hannah bp. 8 July 1781

Phileura     bp. May 30, 1784

Asahel bp. February 27, 1787

Harry (or Henry)   bp. July 5, 1791

Thomas b. August 20, 1794 (1806 guardianship records, Columbia County Courthouse, Hudson, New York)

Note: I am indebted to my cousin Janet Berg Badynski for her original research related to ancestor Daniel Hawley.

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Hilton, Charles

When my DAR ancestor, Charles Hilton, enlisted in the colonial infantry at the age of 23, he was already the fifth generation of his family in America. His great-great grandfather, Edward Hilton I is known as the "Father of New Hampshire." Charles V was the only child of Charles Hilton IV and Hannah Pike.

He served with Benedict Arnold under the direct command of Captain Henry Dearborn during the tragic march through the woods of Maine to Quebec. Traversing a country entirely devoid of game, they suffered from bitter cold and near starvation. When their supplies gave out, they slaughtered two pet dogs and later boiled and ate moccasins and shoe leather.

Two days after they arrived in Quebec, they were taken prisoner and suffered further from vermin and hunger during captivity. The New Hampshire state papers of the Revolution contain an account of the allowance of "twenty-two pounds, eight shillings to Charles Hilton for his loss at Quebec." The state records further show that Charles Hilton later re-enlisted in the regiment that was raised to reinforce the Northern Continental Army in 1777, under the command of Nicolas Gilman. Later that same year, under the command of Colonel Stephen Evans, he marched from New Hampshire to join the Continental Army at Saratoga. For this enlistment of three months and one day, Hilton received wages of thirteen pounds thirteen shillings and a travel allowance: "out to Bennington home from New Windsor, three hundred miles: four pounds, thirteen shillings and three pence."

The Battle of Saratoga is regarded as the turning point in the American Revolution. The battle ended in defeat for the British and brought the French into the war on the side of America, a factor important to the outcome of the war.

After Charles left military service, he married Mary Wadleigh, a niece of Major General Henry Dearborn, his commanding officer in the Quebec campaign. They had seven children, four boys and three girls.

They settled in East Andover, New Hampshire, where they were a successful and highly respected family. They owned and operated a tavern and had a homestead of 299 acres. They also owned 130 acres of investment real estate obtained by 23 deeds recorded at various times.

Known Children:
     Dudley, Elijah, Henry Dearborn, Polly, twins Sally and Charles, and Betsey

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Hunt, Gad

Gad Hunt, son of Simeon and Hannah Loomis Lyman Hunt, was born January 27, 1748, in Lebanon, Connecticut, in Tolland County. On April 16, 1769, at the age of 21, Gad married Elizabeth Aborn Woodward, the seventh daughter of Nathaniel Woodward and Mary Bancroft Aborn. Elizabeth was born August 28, 1747. Her grandparents, the Aborns, were well-to-do and had brought bricks from England to build their home. The family and neighbors were quite distressed when Mary moved to the "wilds of Connecticut" to raise her family with Nathaniel. The story titled "The Pewter Platter" was purportedly written about the Woodward household. Gad's uncle had been an officer in the French and Indian War.

Gad was drafted August 24, 1777, and served until October 30, 1777. He fought in the battles of Saratoga on September 19 and October 9, 1777, per "Record of Service of Connecticut Men in the War of the Revolution" (pp. 504, 508). He first served as a private in Captain Sanford's company and then as a sergeant in Colonel Jonathan Latimer's Militia Regiment, Captain Nathaniel Wales' Company at Saratoga.

Gad and Elizabeth had six children, all of whom lived into adulthood. Gad is listed in the first U.S. Census of 1790 in Coventry Town, Tolland County, CT, as head of a household including three males under sixteen and three females. He died May 6, 1806, and is buried (along with his wife) at the cemetery on Route 31, north of Coventry, Connecticut.

Known Children:
    Esther b. March 10, 1771    
d. 1851   
m. Miner Cobb  

Gad Jr. b. April 14, 1773   m. Mary Bissel

Sanford    
b. April 17, 1777   m. Fanny Rox

Clarissa b. November 27, 1779   m. Azel Goodwin

Elijah b. September 29, 1782   m. 1. Betsy Salmon, 2. Susan Barker

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Jennings, Zachariah

Zachariah Jennings, Jr. was born March 25, 1745 in Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut. He served as a private in Captain Najah Bennett's Company, in service March 1781. In 1767, he married Eunice Risdon who was born April 7, 1748 at Weston, CT. Zachariah died in 1816 in Easton, Fairfield County, Connecticut.

Known Children:
    
Aaron b. October 1790 d. October 22, 1843 m. Sarah Jennings 1811 b. 1794, d. 1833

Abiah

m. David Wheeler

Ichabod

m. Sarah Nichols

Isreal b. February 14, 1774    d. February 2, 1860   
m. Sarah/Sally Elizabeth Howes 1799   
b. 1777, d. September 20, 1857

Bradford   
b. August 17, 1789 d. January 23, 1854 m. Clarissa b. 1777, d. May 23, 1857

Ozias

m. Elizabeth Brown

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Knight, Jonathan

Jonathan, son of Jonathan and Mary Knight, was born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, January 21, 1761, and died in Newbury, Vermont, December 15, 1836. He was a doctor and served in the Revolutionary War in Captain John White's Company. After the war he married Obedience Root in 1781; there is no death date, but he married Betsey Dudley, daughter of John and Sybil Russell Dudley, on October 29, 1789. Betsey was born in Acton, Massachusetts, October 31, 1763 and died in Piermont, New Hampshire, April 30, 1866, at the age of 102 years and 6 months.

He did not move to Westmoreland, New Hampshire, until after 1790.

Known Children:
    
Jerusha b. November 7, 1782 d. 1866 m. ___ Dewey

Obedience   
b. September 28, 1785
d. January 17, 1856 m. ___ Locke

Jonathan b. October 25, 1790 (lived in Piermont, New Hampshire)

Josiah (MD)
b. March 8, 1792

Curtis b. April 15, 1794

Prentiss b. January 21, 1797 (lived in Westmoreland, New Hampshire)   

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Marsh, Samuel

Samuel Marsh was part of a Minute Company of Brookfield, Massachusetts, from the April 19, 1775, with a time of service of 8 days. Marsh was a drummer. In June 1775, he enlisted in the Ninth Continental Regiment for eight months again as a drummer. He served under Captain Jewett Woodbury, and also under Colonel Gerrish.

He was born in 1738, at Salem/Sutton, Massachusetts and died in 1832 at Croyden, New Hampshire. In 1762, he married Rebekah Wilder, who was born in Kittingly, Connecticut, in 1744. Rebekah died (1834) two years after Samuel, after seventy years of marriage. They had three children.

Known Children:
     Betsey, Samuel, Jr., and Joseph Clark

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Martz, George, Sr.

George Martz, Sr. September 1761 - March 1844; 83 years
George Martz, Sr. was born in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, and lived there until he was 57 (1818), when he moved to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he died.

George Martz, Sr., enlisted in the Pennsylvania Militia in November 1779, as a substitute for his father. He served for 6 weeks - the "residue" of his father's tour. His commanding officers were Captain William Mayer, Colonel George Brinigh, and Lieutenant Adam Hicker. He enlisted in Northampton County, Pennsylvania.

In August 1780, he was enlisted by Jacob Teal near Allentown, Northampton, County, PA, and served 2 months, August - October 1780. He hauled supplies from Allentown, Pennsylvania to the North River in New York State. This service "continued" into the Commissary Department.

George Martz, Sr., enlisted in May 1781, as a substitute for Jacob Housman in the Pennsylvania Militia. He was in Captain Radar's Company stationed near Henry Rhinehart's "inprovement" in Heidelberg, Pennsylvania. While he was stationed in Heidelberg there was a battle with the Indians about June 15, 1781.

He was drafted (enlisted) October 25, 1782, for 2 months under Captain Wise and Colonel Michael Pobst. He was in a guard of 32 enlisted men guarding Continental teams and wagons from Allentown, Pennsylvania, to Tapon, New York. "The Brigade of Wagons" was under the command of Captain John Lark.

George Martz, Sr., applied for his Revolutionary War Pension when he was 72 years old. His pension was allowed for 7 months and 7 days. The rate of pension was $24 per annum.

The resources for this information: 1. Viola Root Cameron, International Genealogist of New York City, December 26, 1930. 2. Instrument taken in Greenburgh, Westmoreland County, PA. David Fullwood, Notary (no date)

George Martz, Sr., was probably not an educated man, because when he had to verify something it was said he signed by his "mark." His parents' names and his wife's name are not known - nor is his occupation known. His son, George Martz, Jr., was identified as a farmer.

George Martz, Jr., had a son, William, who was a minister and a daughter, Catherine, who was my great-grandmother.

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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McFall, Cornelius

On July 6, 1781, Cornelius McFall, a Virginia militiaman, was attached to a regiment that marched towards Yorktown under the command of General Thomas Nelson, and according to his pension application, Cornelius McFall was involved in a "skirmish with the enemy at a place called Green Spring." The Battle of Green Spring is said to have been the last major land battle in Virginia, prior to the Seizure of Yorktown. The battle, which took place near the Green Spring Plantation in James City County, Virginia, occurred when the troops of the Continental Army and Virginia Militia waged a daring attack against the British redcoats and Prussian mercenaries. During the battle of Green Spring, Cornelius McFall was one of the patriots that boldly charged the battle-ready army of 2,000 British redcoats, and dogged volley of British fire, as well as British cannon fodder.

However, that was not Cornelius McFall's first time serving his country. Cornelius McFall was drafted into service with the Virginia militia on three different occasions, first in 1777 to serve as a guard at Albemarle Barracks under the command of Colonel Crochet and General Grayson, and later when he marched under the command of Captain Garland to Yorktown, where he remained in service till the surrender of Cornwallis on October 19, 1781.

Born in Ireland in 1733, Cornelius immigrated to Hampton, Virginia, in about 1775, where he followed ditching. From there he moved to Augusta, where he was married and where he returned to his previous trade of weaving. Although the name of his spouse is unknown, Cornelius McFall was the father of at least two sons.

At the time of his pension hearing Cornelius was 98 years old

Known Children:
      Sampson McFall    
b. 1790, Albemarle, Virginia   
 

Thomas McFall b. 1792 d. 1854  

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Montgomery, Thomas

Thomas Montgomery was born in Roanoke, Virginia, in 1745. His great- grandfather had emigrated to America in 1666, just sixty years after the first permanent settlement was made in Virginia, from Ireland. As a boy of twelve years old, with his gun he defended his mother and several other women and children from a blockhouse, killing one Indian and wounding several others. When someone complimented his courage and bravery, he remarked that it was a case of necessity - "foight or doi" (in the Irish Brogue).

He married Martha Crockett in Virginia, in 1767. She was a sister of Colonel Joseph Crockett of the Revolutionary War and a cousin to the famous Davie Crockett of Tennessee "who so gallantly gave up his life at the old Alamo, bravely fighting for Texas independence."

Thomas served as a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War. His six brothers and his father, Hugh Montgomery, Sr., all took part in the War for Independence and all lived to return home.

In 1796, Thomas Montgomery moved from Roanoke County, Virginia, to Mount Sterling, in Montgomery County, Kentucky, and remained there until he and his family emigrated to Indiana in 1806. He was known in Indiana as "Purty Old Tom, The Deer Killer." The prefix "Purty" was attached to his name because of his upright and lithe carriage and his portly appearance. It was said he was straight as an arrow. The "Deer Killer" came from the fact that he killed 160 deer around the springs on the Colonel Jone farm in Gibson County, Indiana. Thomas died in 1818 and is buried in the family cemetery on the farm he settled in 1807.

Known Children:
      Hugh b. 1768 d. 1780

Molly b. 1770
m. Mathias Mounts, he fought in the War of 1812

Joseph b. March 3, 1773 d. 1824 m. Nancy Davis

Jane b. 1774
m. 1. Captain Jacob Warrick, 1795, 2. Dr. John Maddox

Isaac b. 1776 in VA (twin)
m. Martha McClure; he was a state senator and probate judge

Thomas b. 1776 in VA (twin)
m. 1. Betsy Warrick, 2. Katie Teel

Patsy b. 1780
m. Robert McGary in Kentucky, then went to Indiana in 1806

Walter Crockett    
b. 1784, in Roanoke Springs   
d. January 14, 1856    
m. 1. Nancy Roberts, d. 1845, 2. Margaret Powell

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Murphy, William

William Murphy served as Minute Man in the Gloucester and Salem County, New Jersey, militia from 1775 to 1784. There is no record of how much time he actually served but it was throughout that period. One story told of his wife Phoebe's experience with camp followers. William was away and Phoebe was alone with her five small children when an army passed their home. Some camp followers decided to raid the house. The doors and windows were barricaded, so they decided to try entering through the large-throated chimney. Phoebe stayed up all night burning feather beds, pillows, and furniture to protect her family. In the morning, the neighbors saw her plight and came to her rescue.

Phoebe and William moved to Indiana in the early 1800s. The entire family, except the oldest son, who stayed in New Jersey, traveled down the Ohio River on flat boats. Several families settled in Ohio, but Phoebe and William went with their second son to Indiana. They traveled up the White River to Union County and settled there. Phoebe and William were in their sixties when they left New Jersey. They both lived twenty more years and they are both buried in the Old Bath Cemetery in Union County.

William was born May 19, 1742 and died August 20, 1830. He married Phoebe Sherry, but no dates are given.

Known Children:
     John, Mary, Samuel, Recompence, William, Rachel

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Noffsinger, John, Sr.

John Noffsinger/Naftsinger/Nafgzer was a member of Captain Ezekiel Rose, Fifth Battalion, Washington Co., Militia (Pennsylvania Archives, 6th series, volume II). John received 246-1/2 acres of land for his service, the land was on Plum Run, near Ten Mile Creek, in East Bethelehem Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania. He later sold this land to his son Daniel and moved to Montgomery County, Ohio, where he purchased 640 acres of land from the government. The deed was signed by Thomas Jefferson and remains in the family. John is listed as a taxpayer in East Bethelehem, Washington County, Pennsylvania; other information can be found in Maryland and Pennsylvania.

John was the oldest son of Rudolf Noffsinger. He was born in 1751, in Pennsylvania, and died in 1825 at Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio. He married Catherine Koontz; they had ten children.

Known Children:
     Daniel, John Jr., Charles, Andrew, Samuel, Eli, Judah, Lydia, Susana, Sarah

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.
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Randolph, Samuel Fitz

Samuel Fitz Randolph was born October, 1738, at Piscataway, Middlesex County, New Jersey. He died February 25, 1825, in New Salem, West Virginia. He was married to Margaret Fitz Randolph, a relative, on March 25, 1761, by the pastor of the Seventh Day Baptist Church of Piscataway Township, New Jersey. Margaret Fitz Randolph was born November 1739. She died on February 29, 1832. The family name may also have been written: FitzRandolph.

In April 1785, Samuel purchased 300 acres of land in Yellow Creek, Armstrong Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. He and his family moved to Fayette County, Pennsylvania, between November 1785 and November 26, 1790. On November 26, 1790, he purchased over 800 acres of land. He also bought 256 acres in Harrison County, West Virginia, where the town of Salem was laid out. The 256 acres cost 132 pounds, 19 shillings, and 5 pence in Virginia money. He moved to Salem after May 10, 1792. He belonged to the Seventh Day Baptist Church in Piscataway until November 8, 1789, when he transferred to the Woodbridge town church. Samuel and Margaret are buried at Salem, West Virginia.

Samuel enlisted as a soldier in the War of the American Revolution and served as an Ensign in the Second Regiment of Sussex County, New Jersey. His commission reads as follows: To Samuel Randolph Gentleman, Greetings: Whereas it has been certified to H. E. Wm. Livingston, Esq. Governor Commander-in-Chief of this State that you have been duly chosen by the Company of Militia in the County of Sussex being the company of the 2nd Regiment of the said county, whereof Aaron Hankingson Esq. is the Colonel, to be the Ensign of the said company. You, therefore, are to take the said company into your charge and care as ensign thereof etc... this shall be you commission. Witnesses--William Livingston Esq. Gov. Capt. C-in-C in and over the State of New Jersey--Haddonfield, May16, 1777 (By His Excellency's Com. Chas. Petit, secy.)

Known Children:
     Mary, Sarah, Elizabeth, Jesse, David, Rhulanah, Jonathan, Margaret, Nancy

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.
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Schoonmaker, Frederick, Jr.

Frederick Schoonmaker, Jr., the son of Frederick Schoonmaker and Eva Swartwout, was born 13 January 1740 at Marbletown, Ulster County, New York. He married Elizabeth Schoonmaker on August 27, 1760. They became the parents of at least ten children. He died December 2, 1819 at Marbletown, New York.

In the run up to the Revolutionary War, it became important to know those who were friends and who were loyal to the King. It became the duty of Committees of Safety in the Mohawk Valley region of New York to determine friend and foe. In May of 1775, a meeting was held and a document entitled Articles of Association was formed. Signers of the document agreed with the rebel cause and pledged support for the Continental Congress. Frederick Schoonover, Jr. was a signer of this document in Ulster County, New York.

The above information is based on: Signers of the Association in Ulster County.(1775-06-05) New-York Freeholders and Freemen, New-York, Marbletown Committee; Pawling, Levi.(S4-V3-p0585)(Document Details)(Complete Volume)

Frederick Schoonmaker was part of a company of mounted volunteers throughout the Revolutionary War. He had enlisted in this company and helped defray its expenses. His company served under Colonel Levi Pawling and/or Colonel John Cantine, Ulster County Militia (New York), Third Regiment.

Schoonmaker was at Fort Montgomery when the iron chain was stretched across the Hudson River below West Point to hamper British vessels from moving up the Hudson. He helped procure the chain by the selling of a favorite horse. Schoonmaker was also present at the taking of General John Burgoyne during the Saratoga (New York) campaign in 1777.

On February 25, 1778, he was appointed captain during the council meeting at Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York. General George Clinton presided over the council.

Schoonmaker spent much of his fortune in aid of the cause of liberty. He often bought and sent droves of cattle to General George Washington for the sustenance of his army. For this service, General Washington wrote him a letter of thanks.

The above information is based on: Family Papers vol. 14 of Revolutionary Documents, Lessings Field Book of the Revolution through Sons of the American Revolution Applications of William Davis Schoonmaker (great-grandson) and Lucas Elmendorf Schoonmaker (great-great-grandson).

Known Children:     
   
Wintje b. June 13, 1761


Eva b. September 16, 1763    

Lydia b. August 19, 1766    

Frederick b. August 27, 1769    

Thomas b. July 5, 1771    

Sarah b. October 22, 1777    

Thomas b. February 19, 1780    

Jacobus F. b. November 7, 1783    

Tojakim b. May 5, 1785    

Egbert Dumond     
b. July 8, 1788    

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Speed, Henry

Henry Speed was a member of Captain James Smith's 4th New York Regiment and was a private. He was discharged from Bear Skim Ridge close to Morrison, New Jersey.

Henry was born September 23, 1765 at Livingston, New York, and died February 7, 1848 at Harlem, Columbia County, New York. He married Elizabeth Mapes in Charleston, Montgomery County, New York. Elizabeth was born August 4, 1771, and died March 27, 1849 at Columbia County, New York.

Known Children:
      John b. February 22, 1780

Jane b. November 10, 1781

James Jr.    
b. May 19, 1785

Rebecca b. July 18, 1787

Infant b. January 29, 1790

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Stone, James

James Stone was born October 31, 1747, in Haverhill, Massachusetts, the son of Thomas Stone who came from Pembroke, Wales. They were coopers by trade - they made casks and barrels.

As most of the soldiers did, James served with three different companies at different times, and for different lengths of time. He served nine months in Captain J. Bowman's Company. He was in Captain Gordon Hutchin's Company in Colonel Stark's Regiment until August 1, 1775. On April 15, 1778, James re-enlisted for a year in Captain Robinson's Company, in the Northern Army. He participated in the Battle of Bennington, Vermont, and served out his full term.

In April or May of 1777, James was married to Lydia Abbott in Henniker, New Hampshire, by the Reverend Jacob Rice. Lydia was born May 19, 1760, and died September 9, 1837. Lydia was illiterate. James' brother Ezekial was able to sign his Pension Papers, so perhaps James was able to do the same. At best, the family only had a rudimentary education.

The following was taken from the book, "Thomas Stone Family of Haverhill, Massachusetts," 1991, by Earl H. Antes, MD, a Stone descendant.

James Stone, Sr., received a bayonet wound at the Battle of Bunker (Breed's) Hill while fighting against the British in the Revolutionary War. Though he died at an early age (45 years), it is not known whether his death was related to his war injury. His pension papers do not indicate that he was incapacitated with an eventually fatal disease for some time before his death, but he apparently served in the Army for several years after the time of his injury. It is on the basis of his military actions that a number of his descendants became members of the DAR.

The gravestone of James Stone, Sr., in the Plummer Cemetery, Henniker, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, is very well preserved. It is quite likely that the original grave marker was a poor one, and had to be replaced. It is possible that the present tombstone was financed by his Revolutionary War Pension money ($523.55), a rather handsome amount, which had been awarded to his widow shortly before her death. The tombstone inscription reads:
"James Stone died May 15, 1790, AE 35"
A soldier of the Revolution
Erected by his son James Stone


Known Children:
      Richard b. March 18, 1791, Charleston, Montgomery County, New York d. May 11, 1858, Clayton County, Iowa
      Abigail b. October 5, 1792, Claverack, Columbia County, New York d.
      Jacob b. March 23, 1794, Claverack, Columbia County, New York d. August 23, 1861, Lyons, Wayne County, New York
      Elisabeth b. November 20, 1795, Claverack, Columbia County, New York d.
      Henry, Jr.    
b. August 11, 1797, Claverack, Columbia County, New York d. November 8, 1886, Blue Earth County, Minnesota
      George b. June 13, 1799, Claverack, Columbia County, New York
      Ruben b. April 1811, 00, Claverack, Columbia County, New York d. February 14, 1867, Salisbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut
      Luther b. September 25, 1803, Claverack, Columbia County, New York    

      Polly b. November 11, 1805, Claverack, Columbia County, New York
      Samuel b. November 9, 1807, Claverack, Columbia County, New York
      Daniel b. May 26, 1813, Claverack, Columbia County, New York d. 1845

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Willis, Hopestill

In 1775, Hopestill Willis was a private in Captain John Nixon's Company of "Minute Men" in Sudbury, Massachusetts. The "roll call," which is still preserved in the town records, shows the names of 60 men. It met for drill March 13th, 17th, and 20th, and April 3rd, 10th and 17th, showing an absence of an average of one man only each night. Before sunrise on the 19th of April 1775, the alarm reached Sudbury and the Company hastily assembled and marched to Concord, arriving just as the British had been repulsed at the North Bridge, and joined in the pursuit of the retreating foe. The Company had two killed and one wounded during the day. Hopestill Willis later became a lieutenant in Captain Ashael Wheeler's Company, from Sudbury, in Colonel Read's Regiment, General Breckett's Brigade, General Gates Division, and served through the war.

Hopestill Willis, son of John Willis, was born in Sudbury, MA, January 9, 1747. He married Olive Smith and they had eleven children. His and Olive's marriage date and death dates are not known.

Known Children:
     Jonathan, Jonas, Ruth, Daniel, Josiah, Hopestill Jr., Xenos, Peter, Samuel, Susanna, Anna

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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Zink, John

John Zink (Sink) served as a private in Captain Andrew Walker's Company, 11th Regiment, Continental Line, for seven months in 1780. He was born June 6, 1758, in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and was still living there at the time of the war. Elizabeth How,(Howe) Wilson, who was born April 22, 1753, married John Zink on April 8, 1780. On  December 30, 1798, at the age of 40, John Zink died in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, but he was buried at Saxton, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. A funeral home is now on that site. An SAR marker has been placed there. Elizabeth lived until January 19, 1814.

Known Children:
      Enoch b. February 7, 1781 d. March 18, 1841 m. December 29, 1805, Mary Foster
      William b. September 22, 1784   
      Samuel b. August 11, 1788 d. February 15, 1886   
m. December 20, 1812
      Catherine Hanawalt  
      Hannah b. February16, 1791
      John b. November 7, 1792
      Joseph b. August 20, 1794

Attention: This information is provided to assist your research by members and believed to be correct, but may have inconsistencies. This is not an official document of NSDAR.

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